Friday, 21 October 2016

Reference Management: EndNote or RefWorks?

Not sure what reference management or bibliographic software is?

Watch our short introduction:

At the University of Leicester we provide access and support for two software packages:


Both packages allow you to collect and store references, have a Word toolbar to insert citations and bibliographies and to store and annotate PDFs.

Why might you prefer EndNote?

  • It is very popular in certain subjects and you might find that your colleagues/supervisors are using it.
  • If you wish to use the Law referencing style OSCOLA then you will need to use EndNote.
  • If you are using a footnote style that requires short titles - EndNote can be customised better for this than RefWorks, and has a wider range of reference types.
  • Be aware - the University license only covers the use of the EndNote desktop software on university owned computers. You can sync your desktop version with an online account to use at home, but the online account has less features than the desktop version.

Why might you prefer RefWorks? 

  • It is online software so you can access it wherever you have internet access and across multiple machines.
  • If you use GoogleDocs - it has a Add-In (toolbar) for GoogleDocs.
  • If you use Libre/OpenOffice - it has a quick cite function to create citations and bibliographies for non-Word applications.
Also see our 'Which bibliographic software is right for you' which compares the packages in more detail.

Monday, 17 October 2016

Finding our training

I had some feedback last week that searching PROSE is not the easiest way to find out what library training is on offer.

We sympathise with you! An alternative is to look at the list of training on our Researchers page

Or you can look at brand new guide to the Postgraduate Researcher Workshop Programme 

If you have any questions about the training please email Selina or myself:

Friday, 7 October 2016

IT Software & Training for Researchers

Our colleagues in IT Services offer software and training that may be of interested to researchers:

Work off-campus - instructions on accessing email, files and installing Office on your own machine.

Programs for home use - information on software you can install at home for free or at a discount, such as NVivo, SAS and SPSS

Research computing facilities - for those that might need high performance computing, wikis or filedrop services

Help & training - they run training courses on a variety of Office programs. We would highly recommend the Word - Long Document Essentials training to anyone writing a thesis.

If you will need to use software packages to analysis statistics or data then we suggest you look at the Research Methods & Methodologies training available from our colleagues in Researcher Development.

And don't forget that the library also runs lots of training for researchers too!

Friday, 30 September 2016

Autumn PGR Training

We are offering lots of training workshops fro PGRs during the Autumn term, including:
  • Introduction to the library (for those who haven't attended a library induction):
    • 12 October, 10am - 11:30am. Library Seminar Rooms. 1st floor. 
    •  20 October, 10am - 11:30am. Library Seminar Rooms. 1st floor. 
  • Introduction to  Research Data Management
  • Introduction to Reference Management
  • Planning your literature search
  • Conducting your literature search
  • EndNote
  • RefWorks
  • Making research information come to you
  • PubMed vs Medline 
  • Finding grey literature
  • Tools for note taking
  • Who is citing who?
  • Copyright & your thesis
  • Advanced Endnote
  • Advanced RefWorks

 These can be booked via PROSE.

 If you are unable to attend our face-to-face workshops then we also have online tutorials:

 Literature Search
Plan your literature search
Conduct your literature search

Discover how you can use Scopus, Web of Science & Google Scholar to carry out citation searches and set up citation alerts: Who is citing who? And who is citing you? [Video, 18 minutes]

How can we help with your systematic review? [Video, 21 minutes]
Reading list of systematic review resources

Critical Appraisal - a reading list of critical appraisal resources

Keep up to date
Make research information come to you

RefWorks (online bibliographic software)
Get started with RefWorks

EndNote (desktop bibliographic software)
Get started with EndNote
EndNote tutorials [Videos]
Advanced EndNote [PDF]

Data management support for researchers
Introduction to Research Data Management [Video, 8 minutes]
Don't lose your research data! [Video, 34 minutes]

Friday, 23 September 2016

Welcome to new PhD students

A new academic year begins and its time to welcome new PhD students. We hope you enjoy your time here at Leicester. 

The Library is here to help throughout your research. Our homepage and search can be found here. Please visit our Getting Started pages for all you need to know about using the Library. 

There are two librarians who support research students: Selina Lock for Science, Technology and Medicine, and William Farrell for Social Sciences, Arts & Humanities. 

We are here to help you:

  • find information for your research
  • plan literature searches and systematic reviews 
  • get to grips with our resources and databases
  • use bibliographic software to organise your references
  • use referencing styles when writing your thesis. 

The Library also provides a dedicated study space for you: the Nicholas Corah Graduate Reading Room on the first floor of the library. 

We offer 1-2-1 appointments, if you would like in-depth advice. Just email us: or telephone 0116 252 2016. 

Distance learners can talk to us via Skype. We also run training workshops throughout the year. These can be booked via PROSE.

If you missed your department's library induction there will be two events run by us to introduce the Library and our services. These will be:

  • 12 October, 10am - 11:30am. Library Seminar Rooms. 1st floor. 
  •  20 October, 10am - 11:30am. Library Seminar Rooms. 1st floor. 

No need to book and just turn up on the day. We look forward to meeting you. Good luck with your research! 

Friday, 16 September 2016

Should you self-publish your book?

Would you self-publish your monograph? The academic Lesley Hulonce has caused a stir this week by arguing for exactly that. Dissatisfied with the proposed sale price of her monograph from a traditional publisher (over £60) Hulonce decided to publish the book herself through Amazon self- publishing. Read more about her experience here

Other academics have expressed dissatisfaction with publishers; price and the quality of e-books seem to be a particular bug-bears. These are both issues that librarians sympathise with. 

Some authors and imprints have been experimenting with different kinds of publishing. Zero Books (and its offspring Repeater Books) have pioneered a model of quicker, easier publishing that also encourages more imaginative writing. Martin Parker, a Professor here at Leicester, published his co-authored book on Daniel Defoe and the Bank of England with Zero in 2016. Palgrave have developed (copied?) their own version of this model with Palgrave Pivot


There are some obvious pros to self-publishing:
  • You have the power to set a low price or make the book full Open Access. This allows you sell copies to people who aren't university libraries, and increase you readership. And hopefully improve your citations. 
  • It should be a quicker route to publication, as you will not be tied to a publishers' schedule. 
  • You can decide whether the book goes out of print or not. 
It's worth remembering that there is no official requirement that you have to publish with a traditional academic press. Guidance to REF panels is clear: it is the quality of the book that is being assessed, not the reputation of the publisher. 


However, there are some cons that need to be thought about:
  • Will your book be discovererable? Will it be indexed by a service like Google Scholar or a subject database (in Hulonce's case BBIH or Historical Abstracts)? 
  • How will a library know to include the book in its catalogue? Some author self-promotion will be required here, plus the the goodwill of your colleagues in other institutions. And if it was electronic only, how should libraries provide a copy to their users in a sustainable way? 
  • Who is going to arrange (and pay for) all the boring stuff: ISBNs, typesetting, copy-editing, and peer-review. Maybe you are happy to ignore conventions, but it could effect the quality of the final book.   
While the REF says that who you publisher with isn't important, the word-on-the-street is that is does matter when it come to hiring. Job panels aren't reading candidates' monographs (we are told), instead they are using the publisher as a proxy for quality. It takes a determined post-doc to self-publish their first monograph. 

These problems are not impossible to overcome. But they need a coordinated response, like we have for journal publishing with Open Library of the Humanities, rather than individuals having to fight their own battles. 

Friday, 9 September 2016

New RefWorks available now!

RefWorks allows you to manage all the references you have used in your assignments or research.

New RefWorks Users

 New RefWorks logo
  • Create and organise a library of references that you can access via the web
  • Store and annotate the PDFs of articles
  • Import references from bibliographic databases and other information sources
  • Cite while you write using add-in Word/Google Docs features
  • Automatically create bibliographies
If you have never used RefWorks then see our Getting Started Online Tutorial

Existing RefWorks Users

Why should you upgrade to new RefWorks?

    New RefWorks has lots of extra features:
    • Store, view and annotate PDFs
    • Tag your references
    • Quick Cite function
    • Save to RefWorks browser button
    • Word 2016 citation toolbar (Add-In)
    • Google Docs citation toolbar (Add-In)

When should you upgrade to new RefWorks?

New RefWorks and legacy RefWorks will both be available to use during the 2016/17 academic year to allow you to upgrade to new RefWorks at a time that suits you.
  • If you are currently working on your thesis and it will be submitted before the end of July 2017 then we recommend that you continue to use legacy RefWorks.
    • This is because new RefWorks will not work with citations and references already inserted into existing documents with legacy RefWorks.
  •  If you are near the start of your PhD/thesis/research
    • If you are currently reading and collecting references then we recommend you upgrade now:
      • As the new RefWorks has better PDF storage and annotation options.
      • Before you start inserting references using the Word toolbar.
  • If you are partway through writing your thesis and have already inserted a large amount of references using the Word toolbar
    • Be aware that new RefWorks will not work with citations and references already inserted into existing documents with legacy RefWorks.
    • This means that if you upgrade now you will need to re-insert the references using new RefWorks.
    • RefWorks are looking at whether they can solve this problem and we hope to hear something by the end of the year.
  • We recommend that users upgrade to new RefWorks before September 2017, as legacy RefWorks will no longer be available after that date.

Current Issues with new RefWorks

    • New RefWorks and legacy RefWorks are compatible with RefWorks Write-N-Cite (Word toolbar) v4.4.1376:
      • Available on staff machines via the Program Installer.
      • Will be available in all central computer labs by the start of term.
      • available to download on your own machine through RefWorks.
    • There are some issues with the way that referencing styles are formatting in new RefWorks.
We are in contact with RefWorks over the problems with styles and hope that these will be revolved in the next few months.

Still not sure when to upgrade? Email for advice and to arrange for training on new RefWorks.