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EndNote X8

EndNote X8 is being made available on staff and student computers for the 2017/18 academic year.

For staff computers it will be made available to install through the Program Installer. For student computers it will automatically be made available via the Start - All Programs menu.

Remember - the University of Leicester license only allows EndNote X8 to be installed on University owned computers (including University laptops). If you would like to access your references at home then you can sync your EndNote desktop library with EndNote online.

What's new in EndNote X8? If you're an existing EndNote user then check out the 5min video on what's new:




New to using EndNote? Then check out the 5min video on EndNote's main features



You can also find lots more training videos on specific features on the EndNote YouTube Channel.





Recent posts

Data where you might not expect it

Relevant data for research can turn up in some unexpected places. For example, we subscribe to a number of financial databases such as SNL, EIKON and Bloomberg. Their main purpose is to provide financial data on companies, stocks and markets. But to aid the industry analysts who use them, the databases also provide wider macroeconomic and demographic data. They even have information on infrastructure and geography. 


SNL, to focus on one, is strong on US statistics and contains the populations, age structure, household size and incomes, and unemployment rates of US states.

This information can also be mapped, along with:

World airports, cities, ports, railroads, roads and utilitiesReal estate mortgage information across US counties 
Numbers of businesses by NAICS classification. 
Maps created can be exported, like this one of the population density of Houston:





This is a good lesson in going beyond known databases, and using sources against the grain. The full list of statistics databases we …

Want to know if your research has been blogged, tweeted etc?

During the next year we'll be starting to offer more training and advice on traditional publication metrics and atlmetrics. In the meantime there is already a wealth of altmetric data available to University of Leicester staff and researchers.

Almetrics refers to the the alternative ways your research is being referred to. For example, has it been tweeted, blogged, cited in Wikipedia, picked up by news outlets or mentioned on FaceBook?

There are various companies and platforms that are offering data or ways of collating this data. This post will focus on two: PlumX and Altmetric.

Please be aware: Altmetrics is still a new and emerging field and not all research outputs will have altmetrics data.

Altmetrics in Literature Databases You will see the PlumX Metrics icon appearing when you search some of our databases e.g. Scopus and EbscoHost.

For example, this Richard III paper by Turi King et al. - you can see the PlumX Metrics option on the right of the page:


If you click further i…

New Software for Library Journal Publishing?

A few weeks ago the Open Library of the Humanities (OLH) released an open source, test version of Janeway, the software they have developed for publishing journals.

At Leicester, we use a version of Open Journal System (OJS) to publish several journals associated with academic departments. 

OJS is widely used by libraries who support journal publishing. In the UK, Aberdeen, Kent and UCL all use it. It fair to say that many users have a love/hate relationship with it. Editors and reviewers, in particular, find the 'back end' difficult to use.

The release of Janeway, therefore, sparked our interest. From a readers' point of view, OLH journals have always looked attractive and felt easy to navigate. More than that, the release felt like another step towards a more coordinated open access publishing infrastructure. A clearer division of labour emerging where OLH concentrate on 'flipping' subscription journals to OA, and individual libraries concentrate on supporting exist…

The FAIR Data principles: free national workshops for researchers

If you are a researcher in the biological sciences, chemistry, digital humanities and sociology the UK Data Service and Jisc would like to invite you to participate in one of several focus groups exploring the use of FAIR data principles within UK academic research.

Two free to attend workshops will be held in September, one in London and the other in Newcastle.

What is meant by the FAIR Data Principles?
FAIR refers to a set of guiding principles developed by a group of international stakeholders which proposes that scholarly outputs should be:


Findable: easy to find for both humans and computers, with metadata that facilitate searching for specific datasetsAccessible: stored for long term so that they can easily be accessed and/or downloaded with well-defined license and access conditions (open access when possible), whether at the level of metadata, or at the level of the actual dataInteroperable: ready to be combined with other datasets by humans or computersReusable: ready to be used…

Lots of new resources for historians

The University of Leicester Library has recently extended some of our digital collections, that might be of interest to historians:
Grand Tour Online Primary sources on travel writing of the "Grand Tour" of Europe between 1550 and 1850
Jacoby Online An ancient history database: texts of ancient Greek historians including Brill’s New Jacoby and Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker or Fragments of the Greek Historians (FGrHist) Parts I-V
JustisOne A law database: full-text historic UK and Irish legislation from 1235, and links to full-text case law from other legal providers
State Papers Online State Calendars and Papers from both the Tudor (1509-1603) and Stuart (1603-1714) periods
The Times of India
Online archive of key colonial newspaper from 1838 to 2007

The Library and the Centre for Local History have also teamed up to create a new resource:
Centre for English Local History Thesis Collection Makes available the theses completed by students at the Centre for English Local …

Shut Up & Write! Events

Make a date with your writing and join us for distraction-free writing sessions in person or online.
Working on a thesis, journal article or book chapter?
Need some distraction-free writing time?

Library Research Services are running Shut Up & Write! sessions for researchers.
Tuesday mornings 10am-12noon.
15th, 22nd, 29th August (Physics Ground Floor LR LTD) and 5th September (Archaeology Ground Floor SR1).
Session outline: 10am: Arrival & Prep 10.15am: Write 11am: Break & Refreshments 11.15am: Write 12noon: End
There is no need to book, just bring your laptop, pad & pen, or preferred writing tools!
If you can’t join us in person then join us online via https://eu.bbcollab.com/guest/ef24ea4a82934bc0b630a85859eab9f8

Any questions, please email Selina Lock: stl5@le.ac.uk

*Please be aware that these events are not aimed at providing writing help or advice. Please see the University Research Writing pages for more information on how to write a thesis.