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Friday, 23 September 2016

Welcome to new PhD students

A new academic year begins and its time to welcome new PhD students. We hope you enjoy your time here at Leicester. 

The Library is here to help throughout your research. Our homepage and search can be found here. Please visit our Getting Started pages for all you need to know about using the Library. 

There are two librarians who support research students: Selina Lock for Science, Technology and Medicine, and William Farrell for Social Sciences, Arts & Humanities. 

We are here to help you:

  • find information for your research
  • plan literature searches and systematic reviews 
  • get to grips with our resources and databases
  • use bibliographic software to organise your references
  • use referencing styles when writing your thesis. 

The Library also provides a dedicated study space for you: the Nicholas Corah Graduate Reading Room on the first floor of the library. 

We offer 1-2-1 appointments, if you would like in-depth advice. Just email us: librarians@le.ac.uk or telephone 0116 252 2016. 

Distance learners can talk to us via Skype. We also run training workshops throughout the year. These can be booked via PROSE.

If you missed your department's library induction there will be two events run by us to introduce the Library and our services. These will be:

  • 12 October, 10am - 11:30am. Library Seminar Rooms. 1st floor. 
  •  20 October, 10am - 11:30am. Library Seminar Rooms. 1st floor. 

No need to book and just turn up on the day. We look forward to meeting you. Good luck with your research! 

Friday, 16 September 2016

Should you self-publish your book?


Would you self-publish your monograph? The academic Lesley Hulonce has caused a stir this week by arguing for exactly that. Dissatisfied with the proposed sale price of her monograph from a traditional publisher (over £60) Hulonce decided to publish the book herself through Amazon self- publishing. Read more about her experience here

Other academics have expressed dissatisfaction with publishers; price and the quality of e-books seem to be a particular bug-bears. These are both issues that librarians sympathise with. 

Some authors and imprints have been experimenting with different kinds of publishing. Zero Books (and its offspring Repeater Books) have pioneered a model of quicker, easier publishing that also encourages more imaginative writing. Martin Parker, a Professor here at Leicester, published his co-authored book on Daniel Defoe and the Bank of England with Zero in 2016. Palgrave have developed (copied?) their own version of this model with Palgrave Pivot

Pros

There are some obvious pros to self-publishing:
  • You have the power to set a low price or make the book full Open Access. This allows you sell copies to people who aren't university libraries, and increase you readership. And hopefully improve your citations. 
  • It should be a quicker route to publication, as you will not be tied to a publishers' schedule. 
  • You can decide whether the book goes out of print or not. 
It's worth remembering that there is no official requirement that you have to publish with a traditional academic press. Guidance to REF panels is clear: it is the quality of the book that is being assessed, not the reputation of the publisher. 

Cons

However, there are some cons that need to be thought about:
  • Will your book be discovererable? Will it be indexed by a service like Google Scholar or a subject database (in Hulonce's case BBIH or Historical Abstracts)? 
  • How will a library know to include the book in its catalogue? Some author self-promotion will be required here, plus the the goodwill of your colleagues in other institutions. And if it was electronic only, how should libraries provide a copy to their users in a sustainable way? 
  • Who is going to arrange (and pay for) all the boring stuff: ISBNs, typesetting, copy-editing, and peer-review. Maybe you are happy to ignore conventions, but it could effect the quality of the final book.   
While the REF says that who you publisher with isn't important, the word-on-the-street is that is does matter when it come to hiring. Job panels aren't reading candidates' monographs (we are told), instead they are using the publisher as a proxy for quality. It takes a determined post-doc to self-publish their first monograph. 

These problems are not impossible to overcome. But they need a coordinated response, like we have for journal publishing with Open Library of the Humanities, rather than individuals having to fight their own battles. 




Friday, 9 September 2016

New RefWorks available now!

RefWorks allows you to manage all the references you have used in your assignments or research.

New RefWorks Users

 New RefWorks logo
  • Create and organise a library of references that you can access via the web
  • Store and annotate the PDFs of articles
  • Import references from bibliographic databases and other information sources
  • Cite while you write using add-in Word/Google Docs features
  • Automatically create bibliographies
If you have never used RefWorks then see our Getting Started Online Tutorial

Existing RefWorks Users

Why should you upgrade to new RefWorks?

    New RefWorks has lots of extra features:
    • Store, view and annotate PDFs
    • Tag your references
    • Quick Cite function
    • Save to RefWorks browser button
    • Word 2016 citation toolbar (Add-In)
    • Google Docs citation toolbar (Add-In)

When should you upgrade to new RefWorks?

New RefWorks and legacy RefWorks will both be available to use during the 2016/17 academic year to allow you to upgrade to new RefWorks at a time that suits you.
  • If you are currently working on your thesis and it will be submitted before the end of July 2017 then we recommend that you continue to use legacy RefWorks.
    • This is because new RefWorks will not work with citations and references already inserted into existing documents with legacy RefWorks.
  •  If you are near the start of your PhD/thesis/research
    • If you are currently reading and collecting references then we recommend you upgrade now:
      • As the new RefWorks has better PDF storage and annotation options.
      • Before you start inserting references using the Word toolbar.
  • If you are partway through writing your thesis and have already inserted a large amount of references using the Word toolbar
    • Be aware that new RefWorks will not work with citations and references already inserted into existing documents with legacy RefWorks.
    • This means that if you upgrade now you will need to re-insert the references using new RefWorks.
    • RefWorks are looking at whether they can solve this problem and we hope to hear something by the end of the year.
  • We recommend that users upgrade to new RefWorks before September 2017, as legacy RefWorks will no longer be available after that date.

Current Issues with new RefWorks

    • New RefWorks and legacy RefWorks are compatible with RefWorks Write-N-Cite (Word toolbar) v4.4.1376:
      • Available on staff machines via the Program Installer.
      • Will be available in all central computer labs by the start of term.
      • available to download on your own machine through RefWorks.
    • There are some issues with the way that referencing styles are formatting in new RefWorks.
We are in contact with RefWorks over the problems with styles and hope that these will be revolved in the next few months.

Still not sure when to upgrade? Email librarians@le.ac.uk for advice and to arrange for training on new RefWorks.

Friday, 2 September 2016

Top Ten Articles from Leicester Research Archive


Last week we shared the most downloaded PhD Theses in the Leicester Research Archive (LRA), this time we highlight the most downloaded articles of 2015/16. These publications cover a wide range of research at Leicester from Law to Engineering, Geography to Museum Studies. Many of these articles are available thanks to Green Open Access arrangements. 


Top Ten Most Downloaded Articles in 2015/16


1.     Cunningham, Sally, Recklessness: Being Reckless and Acting Recklessly King's College Law Journal (2010 )         http://hdl.handle.net/2381/10894

2.     Naismith, Laura et al.,   Mobile technologies and learning   Futurelab Literature Review Series, Report No 11  http://hdl.handle.net/2381/8132

3.     Hainsworth, Sarah V. & Uhure, N.J.,  Diamond like carbon coatings for tribology: production techniques, characterisation methods and applications International Materials Reviews, (2007)      http://hdl.handle.net/2381/4745

4.     Thomas, Sean,   Mistake of Identity: A Comparative Analysis,  Lloyd's Maritime and Commercial Law Quarterly (2008)       http://hdl.handle.net/2381/10084

5.     Madge, Clare et al.,   Facebook, social integration and informal learning at university: 'It is more for socialising and talking to friends about work than for actually doing work' Learning, Media and Technology (2009)       http://hdl.handle.net/2381/9016

6.     Rona, Aldo,  The acoustic resonance of rectangular and cylindrical cavities  Journal of Algorithms and Computational Technology (2007)      http://hdl.handle.net/2381/1986

7.     Colman, Andrew M. et al., Comparing Rating Scales of Different Lengths: Equivalence of Scores From 5-Point and 7-Point Scales Psychological Reports (1997)         http://hdl.handle.net/2381/3915

8.     Armstrong, Peter, The costs of Activity-Based Management   Accounting, Organizations and Society (2002)  http://hdl.handle.net/2381/3645
   9.     Mercer, Justine, The challenges of insider research in educational institutions:   wielding adouble-edged sword and resolving delicate dilemmas Oxford Review of Education (2007)         http://hdl.handle.net/2381/4677

10. Hartshorne, John,   Confusion,Contradiction and Chaos within the House of Lords post Caparo v Dickman Tort Law Review (2008)  http://hdl.handle.net/2381/27596


Friday, 26 August 2016

Top Ten Theses from the Leicester Research Archive

Top Ten most downloaded theses from the Leicester Research Archive over the last year are:

1) Anxiety in high functioning children with autism (1999) by Alinda Gillott

2) From law to faith : letting go of secret trusts (1999) by Stephen James Alan Swann

3) The process and outcome of Transactional Analysis psychotherapy for the treatment of depression : an adjudicated case series (2013) by Mark Widdowson

4)  Financial Development, Economic Growth and Stock Market Volatility: Evidence from Nigeria and South Africa (2010) by Umar Bida Ndako

5)  The impact of Chinese culture on performance management practices in foreign firms operating in China (2014) by Anthony Wong Yuk Sun

6) The situation of street children in Zimbabwe: a violation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989) (2009) by Markim Wakatama

7)  Developing an ESP curriculum for students of health sciences through needs analysis and course evaluation in Saudi Arabia (2011) by Abdulaziz Fahad T. Alfehaid

8) Social and psychological factors in learning English as a foreign language in Lebanon (1991) by Rula Jamil Yazigy

9) The propagation of VHF and UHF radio waves over sea paths (2002) by Chow Yen Desmond Sim

10)  Military intervention in Nigerian politics : what has the press got to do with it? (1997) by Bernard Nnamdi Emenyeonu

In fact theses are the most popular items to download from the Leicester Research Archive:



Browse our theses collection

Thursday, 18 August 2016

Our greatest hits - getting the most out of EndNote

I have been looking over the bog and video stats recently. It's always interesting to see what's popular, and it's no surprise that using EndNote dominates the top ten. Below I have reproduced the two most viewed posts: How to text-mine using EndNote, and how the EndNote plug-in for PowerPoint works. 

For more help using EndNote there is lots more advice on our  web pages


Searching the fulltext of PDFs in EndNote


You can see how we used these techniques as part of a text mining project:Unlocking REF2014: Text mining to show your impact: Watch the recording.

Did you know that you can search across the full text of PDF articles within EndNote desktop?

First get the PDFs into EndNote:

Import references from literature databases.

Use the 'Find Full Text' feature.

Set-up the 'OpenURL Link' Feature.











Choose the references you wish to search and set the search field to PDF:


 
  
There are some limitations to the full text search:

- Needs human intervention – search within PDFs found to see context of keyword (e.g. using Ctrl + F)

- Some elements in the PDF (e.g. legends underneath graphics) may not be searchable.

Inserting Citations & References into PowerPoint with EndNote

EndNote X7, which is available on University computers, now has a toolbar for inserting citations and references into PowerPoint.

EndNote X7 Toolbar in PowerPoint

1)    Open up PowerPoint and place your cursor where you wish to insert a citation or a reference.
2)    Click on the EndNote X7 tab.
3)    Choose the reference style you want to use from the drop-down menu.
4)    Click Insert Citation or Insert Reference
5)    Search for the reference you want or search on * to bring up a list of all your references.
6)    Click on Insert.

You will need to insert the citation and the references separately as this is not a Cite While You Write toolbar like the one in Word.

Example of a citation and a reference inserted using the toolbar and the Harvard style.